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Riding A Motorcycle In Slow Traffic

Perfecting Riding A Motorcycle In Slow Traffic

The Riding A Motorcycle In Slow Traffic racetrack isn’t the place to learn to stop. Track days are expensive, time-consuming events that happen only a few times a year but you can ride around an empty or abandoned parking lot for free nearly any day of the year. Save yourself time and money by practicing your braking and steering inputs in a parking lot so you can spend your track time working on high-speed maneuvering. All you will need is an empty parking lot that is free from gravel and oil, a measuring tape, an hour of your time and some cones or chalk or some other way of marking the ground.

Perfect Road Riding A Motorcycle

Measure out 10-feet and mark both ends of the line with a cone or chalk and draw a circle around the line. Measure another 10-foot line that touches the edge of the previous circle and mark the ends of the line with a cone or chalk and draw a circle around the line. You should have two 10-foot circles side by side. Begin Riding A Motorcycle In Slow Traffic around the first circle at 15 mph. You should be looking at the other end of the circle as you spin around the circle. Try increasing your speed slightly. Does the Riding A Motorcycle On The Street feel more or less stable at higher speeds? Change your body position so that the bike is leaned over but you are sitting upright with your weight resting on the outside foot peg. Does the bike feel more or less stable the farther the bike is pitched over and the more upright you sit?
Move on to trying a figure 8 by Riding A Motorcycle In Slow Traffic clockwise around one circle and counter-clockwise around the other circle. This will help you ride with your feet light on your toes to aid how well you transition from one side to the other. Now we move on to practicing braking. Draw a chalk line and mark a line off every six inches behind that line for 4 feet. Ride at 25 mph with our heads looking up at the horizon and our peripheral vision searching for the line.
As we approach the line we apply the front and rear brakes and stop in as little time as possible. Did you keep your head up, staring at the horizon the whole time? If not repeat the process until you feel comfortable looking off at the horizon even as the bike dips forward under heavy braking. Notice how and where your tire finally came to a stop. Repeat this drill until your can reduce the amount of space it takes you to go from 25 mph to a controlled stop. Try applying more or less front and rear brakes until you feel the tires start to go into a slide. This is the upper threshold of your braking and a parking lot, not racetrack, is the best place to learn to stop better.…

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Riding A Motorcycle On The Street

 

Tips For Riding A Motorcycle On The Street With A Passenger

Are you thinking about taking a trip on your Riding A Motorcycle On The Street and plan on having a passenger along with you for the ride? Here are some tips that will help you ride your motorcycle safely when you have a passenger on board.

Getting On And Off The Motorcycle

If you are going to have a passenger riding with you, make sure you (the driver) are the first one on and the last one off of the Riding A Motorcycle On The Street. This allows you to always stay in control of the motorcycle while your passenger is getting on and getting off the motorcycle. You never want to let your passenger get on first because the bike can become unstable and tip over causing possible injuries.

Balance

Another change that occurs when you have a passenger while riding your motorcycle is the balance of the motorcycle. Because there are two of you on the Riding A Motorcycle On The Street now, it is going to be more difficult to balance the bike when starting and stopping. When coming to a stop or starting out, make sure you keep both feet planted firmly on the ground and both hands securely on the handlebars. This will allow you to have full control of the motorcycle during these times.

Increased Weight, Decreased Stopping Ability

The first thing you have to keep in mind when riding your motorcycle with a passenger is that you are going to be much heavier than if you were riding by yourself. What does this mean? It means that you and your motorcycle are now heavier and more difficult to stop, or at least it will take longer to stop than before. This means that you will have to account for upcoming stops a little sooner than you normally would.

Turning

Another aspect of How Safe Is Riding A Motorbike that is affected when you have a passenger on the motorcycle with you is turning. Because there are now two of you, the way that the motorcycle handles in turns will now be different because of the increased weight. You might have to instruct your passenger about leaning into turns at the same time that you do. One thing that you don’t want your passenger to do is lean the opposite direction as you when going into a turn. This can cause instability and can increase the risk of getting into a crash.
Keeping you and your passenger safe while riding your motorcycle should always be your number one priority. If you take caution while riding and always ensure that you are handling the motorcycle properly, then you’ll be able to enjoy safe rides for many years to come.…