How To Restore A Car For Beginners

How To Restore A Car For Beginners to Factory New?

Restoring a car to “Factory New” conditions is the most time consuming and costly restoration project of them all. This is because the car has to be completely taken apart and all the parts would then have to be repaired or replaced with other original authentic parts. From the mechanical assemblies to the interior seating, everything is ripped out and made life new. This project definitely requires a commitment on the restorer’s part as parts do not always come so easily. And sometimes, it won’t be the part you are waiting for, but funds with which to buy them. To How To Restore A Car For Beginners to “Factory New” condition is mostly for the collector who wishes to present the car at auto shows where purity and authenticity rank extremely high. For most car restoration enthusiasts, taking a car to this level is way beyond what they had in mind when they decided to restore a classic car.

Car Restoration Step

A step below the “Factory New” car restoration project is the “Nearly New” project. This level of restoration is mainly for the How To Restore A Car For Beginners who still wants a challenge but also wants to enjoy the fruits of his labors by being able to drive his completed project. With this kind of project, it is not always necessary to disassemble the entire car. Each section can be carefully evaluated to determine just how much work needs to be done to bring it up snuff. If a part of the car only needs a good cleaning, then there is no need to go to the trouble of trying to find parts to replace it. Since many restorers want their cars to be road worthy, it is also perfectly acceptable to install newer systems that help keep you safer, such as updated braking and safety belts. You can even install a car alarm to protect your investment. Be aware, though-unlike a “Factory New” restoration, the car’s value may not be as high with this type of restoration but at the same time, since you are not trying to achieve perfection the costs should be less as well.
Similar to a “Factory New” restoration, a Period Correct restoration takes the car back to a time when the owner of the car may have had aftermarket parts put on the car such as a dual exhaust or headers. While the rest of the car would be restored to as close to a factory condition as possible, the restorer would go a step further and find aftermarket parts of that period to add onto the collector car. Many How To Restore A Car For Beginners choose this type of restoration because it allows them additional flexibility and creativity to make changes that might make the car more fun.
Every so often, you’ll come across a car that has been well maintained since the owner first purchased it off the show room floor. In cases like these, the car doesn’t need to be restored, per se, but merely touched up. Though cars like these do tend to show their age, it is this characteristic that adds to their charm. When evaluating just how much “restoring” will do to a car like this, it is important to keep in mind the How To Restore Old Car Interior adage; “if it’s not broke, don’t fix it” in mind. You want to keep an eye on the maintenance of the car’s originality character while repairing or bringing other worn systems up to date.

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